All Events

  • July 8th Focus Group (3)
    Sat, Jul 08
    University of Texas Community Engagement
    Jul 08, 2017, 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM
    University of Texas Community Engagement, 1109 E 11th St, Austin, TX, USA
    The first two weekends of July will host a series of 90 minute focus groups on the intersectional stress experienced by African American women. For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women.
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  • July 2nd Focus Group (2)
    Sun, Jul 02
    University of Texas Community Engagement
    Jul 02, 2017, 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM
    University of Texas Community Engagement, 1109 E 11th St, Austin, TX, USA
    The first two weekends of July will host a series of 90 minute focus groups on the intersectional stress experienced by African American women. For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women.
    Share
  • July 1st Focus Group (1)
    Sat, Jul 01
    University of Texas Community Engagement
    Jul 01, 2017, 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM
    University of Texas Community Engagement, 1109 E 11th St, Austin, TX, USA
    The first two weekends of July will host a series of 90 minute focus groups on the intersectional stress experienced by African American women. For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women.
    Share

"No matter what it is. If we eat it’s because of the pain inside and it is so deep that we don’t always know how to handle it. So we get something that we can control because we can’t control the pain.”

Research Focus Groups

Each focus group will be provided a meal, provided by Niella Catering. Each focus group will be followed by a short debriefing session. The debriefing session will ensure that all participants have the ability to constructively move through any resulting emotional responses due to the potentially triggering subject matter. 

On July 1st, 2nd and 8th from 2-7pm there will be a series of  90 minute focus groups will be held on intersectional stress experienced by African American women. Kimberle Crenshaw, a scholar activist, coined the term intersectionality, which is defined as “the recognition that group identities such as race and gender cannot be understood in isolation from one another."

 

For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women. Therefore, intersectional stress is defined as stress produced as a result of the interaction of multiple social identities.

Each focus group will be taken through a series of questions and simply asked their opinion. Question themes include but are not limited to: How are the life experiences of African American women shaped by their roles as both gender and race minorities? Are these experiences different than their gender and race counterparts? If so, how? What is the relationship, if any, between food and the stressors resulting from the intersectionality of their group memberships? 

Inclusion Criteria

  • Self identifying African American

  • Cis-gendered Woman

  • Aged 25-70 years old

  • Resident of Travis County

  • Must have a email address

Exclusion Criteria

  • Non-English speaking participant

Participants will receive no compensation for the participation the focus groups. All participants must fill out a screening form, a demographic form, and a consent form to participate in the focus groups. No identifying information will be collected from participants. Demographic information will be kept confidential. Notwithstanding, each focus group will be transcribed and each participant will be notified and must consent to the transcription.

 
RESEARCH PURPOSE

The purpose of the study is to investigate the relationship between food and intersectional stress. The long term goals for my research includes the following: evaluate the impact of intersectional stress on the health of African American women and identify behavioral coping mechanisms utilized by African American women that are effective in mediating the effects of intersectional stress. The research questions emerged from a critique of the existing literature on the impact of intersectional stress experienced by African American women and focused on the role of food as a coping substance.

 

For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women. Therefore, intersectional stress is defined as stress produced as a result of the interaction of multiple social identities.

 

Researcher

Kristina Brown, M.P.H Candidate

Kristina Brown is an epidemiologist by training with specialty in the identification and assessment of disparities (race and gender). With a Biology background, Kristina combines her knowledge of physiological and psychosocial factors for the delivery of care using both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Her thesis project, explores the relationship between food and intersectional stress experienced by African American women.

She is currently a MPH candidate at the University of Texas School of Public Health in the Epidemiology department with a concentration in Health Disparities. Invested applying her skills and empowering her community she is the cofounder and President of Counter Balance: ATX. Counter Balance: ATX is a grassroots non-profit organization purposed to improving the quality of life of women of the global majority and impoverished women, through policy updates, self-care programs and events and programs. Kristina is also the legislative aid and communications director for State Representative Shawn Thierry. She interns with the Alliance for African American Health in Central Texas and holds multiple appointments on boards at the University of Texas Austin.

RESUME:

 

Existing Research

 

Sponsors

This research is being sponsored by Counter Balance: ATX and the University of Texas School of Public Health. The study design has been reviewed and approved by The University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston Office of Academic Affairs and Student Services. This study was determined to be exempt by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects as study # HSC-SPH-17-0481. 

 
 

All Events

  • July 8th Focus Group (3)
    Sat, Jul 08
    University of Texas Community Engagement
    Jul 08, 2017, 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM
    University of Texas Community Engagement, 1109 E 11th St, Austin, TX, USA
    The first two weekends of July will host a series of 90 minute focus groups on the intersectional stress experienced by African American women. For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women.
    Share
  • July 2nd Focus Group (2)
    Sun, Jul 02
    University of Texas Community Engagement
    Jul 02, 2017, 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM
    University of Texas Community Engagement, 1109 E 11th St, Austin, TX, USA
    The first two weekends of July will host a series of 90 minute focus groups on the intersectional stress experienced by African American women. For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women.
    Share
  • July 1st Focus Group (1)
    Sat, Jul 01
    University of Texas Community Engagement
    Jul 01, 2017, 2:00 PM – 7:00 PM
    University of Texas Community Engagement, 1109 E 11th St, Austin, TX, USA
    The first two weekends of July will host a series of 90 minute focus groups on the intersectional stress experienced by African American women. For the purpose of this research study Crenshaw's theory has been extended to categorize stress, in this case, stress experienced by African American women.
    Share
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